© Grit Kallin-Fischer
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Wunderbar Together Celebrates 100 Years of Bauhaus with Events from Coast to Coast

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the legendary Bauhaus school, which has roots in Germany but soon spread across the globe. Wunderbar Together celebrated this milestone with a series of events and partnerships from coast to coast.

© Mark Roemisch
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When Children Think about Our World: The Digital Kinderuniversity

How big is space? Do our eyes also grow as we get bigger? What would the world be like if our children were given the chance to rewrite the concept of fairness?  These and many other questions were explored by around 400 children in Boston on November 1, 2019 at the event “A WORLD OF LEARNING” by the Goethe-Institut’s Digital Kinderuniversity.

© Wunderbar Together
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Celebrate Thanksgiving with Apple Pancakes and Spoonfuls of Germany!

German-American chef Nadia Hassani has been bringing German recipes to an American audience for well over a decade on her blog, Spoonfuls of Germany. In honor of Thanksgiving, she’s sharing one of her favorite recipes with us!

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The Goethe-Institut Opens Three New Facilities in Washington, Boston, and Los Angeles

The Year of German-American Friendship may be coming to a close this winter, but the Goethe-Institut is certainly not done with its work in the US! The Institute reaffirmed its commitment to the transatlantic relationship by re-opening three regional institutes in brand new facilities in Washington, Boston, and Los Angeles.

© Sibylle Bergemann
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The Medea Insurrection Celebrates Women’s Artistic Resistance Behind the Iron Curtain

Thirty years ago, the Berlin Wall came down. But it didn’t happen on its own. In reality, the Wall was “brought down by courageous people,” including many artists. The Medea Insurrection: Radical women Artists Behind the Iron Curtain, a special exhibition at the Wende Museum in Culver City, California, seeks to highlight the work and experiences of women artists, a group too often overlooked in historical discussions of life in East Germany.